Acknowledgements1. Language and Identity1.1. What Is a Speech Community?1.2. Coercive vs. Collaborative Relations1.3. Language Minority Stories2. Who Are English Learners?2.1. Reflection Model2.2. Inclusive Pedagogy2.2. Makoto Critical Incident2.3. Assumptions to Rethink about English Learners2.4. Critical Learning Domains3. Understanding Theory3.1. Communication, Pattern, and Variability 3.2. Five Curriculum Guidelines3.3. Indicators of Instructional Conversation (IC)3.4. Indicators of the Standards for Effective Pedagogy3.5. Standards for Effective Pedagogy3.6. Examining Current Realities4. Input4.1. Input and Native Language Acquisition4.2. Input and Second Language Acquisition4.3. The Interdependence Hypothesis4.4. The Threshold Hypothesis4.5. Vocabulary Development and Language Transfer4.6. Text Modification5. Interaction5.1. Code Switching and Interaction5.2. Characteristics of Modifications for Interaction5.3. How Can Teachers Help Second Language Learners Begin to Communicate?5.4. Classroom Routines and Participation Structures5.5. We Can Talk: Cooperative Learning in the Elementary ESL Classroom6. Stages of Development6.1. Proficiency Levels Defined7. Errors and Feedback7.1. Points to Remember About Errors7.2. Effective and Appropriate Feedback for English Learners8. Types of Proficiencies8.1. Fostering Second Language Development in Young Children8.2. Instructional Conversation in Native American Classroom 8.3. Student Motivation to Learn8.4. Language Learning Strategies: An Update8.5. Three Misconceptions about Age and L2 Learning9. Types of Performances9.1. Understanding BICS and CALP9.2. The Order of Acquisition and The Order of Use9.3. Schumann's Acculturation Model9.4. Implications From the Threshold and Interdependence Hypotheses9.5. Lily Wong Fillmore’s Cognitive and Social Strategies for Second Language Learners10. Classroom Practices and Language AcquisitionIndex
2.3

Assumptions to Rethink about English Learners

Consider the following assumptions that are commonly made about English learners. Reflect on what your own assumptions and experiences might be. 

Assumptions about English Learners

Assumption #1: ELLs are homogeneous.

Assumption #2: All ELLs are immigrants.

Assumption #3: Parents of ELLs do not speak English.

Assumption #4: ELLs are fluent in their native language.

Assumption #5: English-language proficiency is an indicator of intellect.

Assumption #6: Social English proficiency equates with academic English proficiency.

Assumption #7: Using a native language in school interferes with English-language acquisition.

Assumption #8: English is their second language.

Assumption #9: A classroom buddy is a translator.

Assumption #10: Communication is not possible because of language barriers.

Then read an article by Anabel Gonzalez from Education Week discussing how reality differs from these assumptions. 

References

Gonzalez, A. (2016, November 1). 10 Assumptions to Rethink about English-Langauge Learners. Retrieved from https://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2016/11/01/10-assumptions-to-rethink-about-english-language-learners.html